Calendar

| Monday, 10 September 2018 |
Global event

In the Field in Niedecker Country: new findings and fresh delights

4:00 PM
Guest Speaker: Jenny Penberthy





In the Field in Niedecker Country: new findings and fresh delights







Jenny will outline and discuss new discoveries she's made in the archives and in the classroom. She will also refer to the upcoming trip around Lake Superior tracing Niedecker's own journey.








Global event

Mindfulness meditation

4:15 PM
The Beloit Zen Community invites you to join us in meditation [zazen] and dialogue. No experience with meditation is required: Roshi Myoyu Andersen from Great Plains Zen Center will be on hand to offer supportive guidance for beginners and for advanced practitioners.
Mindfulness practices can help you find balance in your life, to explore strategies of understanding and managing stress, to re-discover sources of happiness and meaning, and to connect with community. You can also learn more about Zen practice and principles specifically, as one way among others of approaching mindfulness practice.
Everyone is truly welcome! Please come sit with us!
Global event

Quarter Century Club Dinner

5:30 PM
Quarter Century Club Dinner
Global event

Peet Family Archaeology

7:00 PM
Archaeology of the Founder’s Family: Investigating the Home of Minerva Peet Fuller
Presentation by William Green (James E. Lockwood Jr. Director of the Logan Museum of Anthropology)
Summary: In 2006, Beloit College students, faculty, and staff and community volunteers exposed and excavated part of an 1840s-1850s house site at the parking lot behind the college’s Guest House. The house belonged to Minerva B. Fuller and was home to Minerva, her son Charles, and a Norwegian immigrant young woman named Julia. We recently discovered that Minerva was the sister of Beloit College founder Stephen Peet: her full name was Minerva Beulah Peet Fuller. This presentation summarizes the documentary record and the archaeological findings—structures, pit features, artifacts, and animal bones—and discusses the site’s significance in terms of campus archaeology and family, college, and community history.